A Typical or Atypical Pastor's Wife-whichever one you come to believe



Welcome to the barnyard. Watch your step! The things written here are raw and unedited. Just my thoughts thrown on a page as they flow from my heart.



Thursday, December 11, 2008

It's YOUR Turn to Write my Blog Today!

Because I'm my hubby's "helpmate", I subscribe to several on-line newsletters that would be of interest and a help to his ministry. He's neither has the time nor the computer savvy to do this himself, so I do it for him as he is interested in keeping up with cultural issues that affect those to whom he ministers to. Recently I found this article about "holiness", often a dirty word even in the evangelical circles, and thought it would be a good discussion generator.

So if you choose to read this article, please take a minute and share what holiness means to you. What do you do think holiness means positionally and practically? How has your view and practice of holiness changed as you have matured in Christ? Do you think holiness is more of inward or outward thing? What are some do's and don'ts that you have adopted as a result of holiness within, or do you feel that holiness has freed you from do's and don'ts?

Enjoy!


Living a Holy Life
by John Chasteen

Work at living in peace with everyone, and work at living a holy life, for those who are not holy will not see the Lord."--Hebrews 12:14, NLT
What comes to mind when you hear the word "holiness"? For most of us, it conjures up all kinds of negative associations related to legalistic rules and behavior.
In this day of public scandal, many are asking important questions such as, "What is biblical holiness?" "Is it important anymore?" In light of these and other pressing concerns it might do us good to revisit the concept.

Let's start by saying that God has called every believer to holiness (see 1 Thess. 4:7). The commonly used Greek word for holiness is hagios, and it literally means "to be set apart or separated unto God." Similarly, the Hebrew word for holiness is kodesh, and it carries the idea of setting something apart as different or uncommon, not for everyday use.
The word "holy" or one of its derivatives is used more than 425 times in the Old Testament and at least 165 times in the New Testament. It seems God is trying to make a point!
A lifestyle of holiness is a life that is lived as separated unto God, one that is not common or like everyone else's. It is one that's different from the lives of worldly people.
It is important to remember that though the word "holiness" is defined as being uncommon and set apart from the world, it does not have the connotation of being weird or irrelevant. Being holy simply means that one does not march to the same beat the world does.
Holiness always begins on the inside of the believer. It is not merely a list of dos and don'ts that Christians must comply with; rather, it is a byproduct of our relationship with Christ and stems from our position in Him (see Col. 1:22).
Provisional holiness-what Jesus won for us on the cross-is a wonderful reality, but it must be accompanied by a life of practical holiness lived by the power of the Holy Spirit. Practical holiness means we regularly crucify the flesh, deny ourselves and understand the meaning of sacrifice. This makes us different and in the biblical sense, holy.
Our text says we should work at living a holy life, that we should pursue it. A lifestyle of holiness can elude us if we are not careful. So work hard in your pursuit of it-great dividends await you.

2 comments:

  1. Holiness is intensely practical Christianity! The "set apart" idea is what is so practical to me. Because I love Jesus, the way that I treat my husband is entirely separate from what is common practice in this world. And so it goes for ordering one's day, raising children, cooking, cleaning, driving a car, doing miscellaneous work...all things performed in a way and with a grace that is quite opposite from this world's way of doing things.

    -Nikki

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  2. What do you do think holiness means positionally and practically?

    I think without holiness no one can 'see' the LORD. If I want to 'see' his face, ie experience His presence I must position my heart surrendered to let His holiness be worked within my heart. In a practical sense it means to not follow the crowd, to 'tune out' things like teachings that are not sound and do not bear witness to the Word of God, and to the Holy Spirit within. It means to turn my eyes away from things that visually can be a snare. Not to live like a hermit but to not be ignorant of the devices of the world and enemy. It means if my heart has a sense of holiness my mouth will follow, I will not speak bad words or my words (or lack of!) will be different than the common person.


    How has your view and practice of holiness changed as you have matured in Christ? My view has become more God focused, worried more how He feels about things instead of my own feelings or other Christians' feelings. I am more guarded to make sure nothing causes what He has set apart in me to seep out and slip away.


    Do you think holiness is more of inward or outward thing? I think it's both but I focus more inward and the outward is a by-product.

    What are some do's and don'ts that you have adopted as a result of holiness within, or do you feel that holiness has freed you from do's and don'ts?

    Words are very important to me/us, we do not use curse words or 'oh my God' type phrases, we don't take our words lightly, we don't watch alot of tv programs that have worldly attitudes, we are very independent in a good way and I feel this stems from holiness and choosing to be set apart for God, for His calling, we are free from being overly dependent on man and society and the worldliness of church for our identity. And we're normalish we don't go around acting weird or condescending to anyone.

    Emi

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